Passing Glaisdale railway Station on the way out of Glaisdale village.

Glaisdale Station is on the route of the North York Moors Steam Railway.

      

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Leaving Glaisdale.

      

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Passing through East Arncliffe Wood.
Note the masses of wild flowers - particularly the bluebells.

      

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The day's route closely follows the River Esk for about 5 miles.

      
 

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Woods near Egton Bridge.

      

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Egton Bridge RC Church

      

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Here the C2C route follows an old toll road, Barnards Road (now a private road through Egton Estates).
A surviving notice on a house just past Beckside Farm gives the charges as of August 1948

      

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Close up of the Barnards Road toll notice dated August 1948

      

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At Grosmont.
The name Grosmont is derived from the French 'gros mont' meaning 'big hill', and is named after the large mound upon which Grosmont Castle was built.

      

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Grosmont Station.
Part of the North Yorks Moors Steam Railway.

      

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Grosmont Station.
Part of the North Yorks Moors Steam Railway.

      

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On Grosmont Station.
Part of the North Yorks Moors Steam Railway.

      

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Back on the high North York Moors.

The short but very steep climb out of Grosmont back up onto the moors is hard work. The road is tarmac and rises over 650ft with a 1:3 gradient.

      

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The first sign (literally) that the North Sea is nearby.
Whitby is only a few miles north of Robin Hood's Bay.

      

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Whitby can just about be seen in the far distance.

      

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Little Beck Wood is a nature reserve that covers over 65 acres. The semi natural woodland consists mainly of oaks, interspersed with ash, alder, hazel, cherry, rowan holly and conifers. The reserve is also well known for its collection of mosses, fungi and insects.
Little Beck stream passes through the reserve with cascades and waterfalls.

      

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Entering Little Beck Nature Reserve.

      

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Little Beck Nature Reserve.
Beautiful woodland scenery.

      

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Little Beck Nature Reserve.

“The Hermitage” - a huge sandstone boulder which has had a room carved into it.
Above the entrance is etched the year 1790.

      

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A group photo outside the Little Beck 'Hermitage'.

      

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Little Beck Nature Reserve.

'Falling Foss' waterfall.

      

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Little Beck Nature Reserve.

      

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Little Beck Nature Reserve.

Stepping stones across Little Beck.

      

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At the SE end of Little Beck Nature Reserve.

      

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At the SE end of Little Beck Nature Reserve.

      

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Near High Hawsker.
Clouds gather ominously and lightening is seen over the distant moors.
(But we only receive a light shower)

      

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Near High Hawsker.
Clouds gather ominously and lightening is seen over the distant moors.
(But we only receive a light shower)

      

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The route now takes us more directly to Whitby which can just be made out in the distance.

      

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A clearer view of Whitby and the North Sea.

      

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Nearly at the Maw Wyke Hole cliffs. 

      

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Along the cliff tops heading for Robin Hood's Bay.

      

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Along the cliff tops heading for Robin Hood's Bay.

      

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The first view of Robin Hood's Bay.

      

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Robin Hood's Bay getting closer.

      

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Arrival at Robin Hood's Bay.

Note the weather. 
Barely any rain fell during the whole 13 days.

      

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The customary throwing of the St Bees beach pebble into the North Sea.

      

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The traditional wetting of feet in the North Sea.

      

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Mandatory photo outside the Bay Hotel by the harbour.

      

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'Wainwright's Bar' in the Bay Hotel.

The Bar holds a book which all those successfully completing the Coast to Coast Walk are encouraged to sign.

Already inside the Bar were some of the other C2C'ers we had met on and off during the previous two weeks.

      

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The final walk up the steep main street of Robin Hood's Bay.

      

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